Peer-support groups positively impact diabetes patients

Media Contact: Chris Sardelli, christopher.sardelli@atriumhealth.org

The combination of one-on-one peer support and the instruction of healthy lifestyle behavior methods can have a positive effect on patient self-care, based on a recent study involving Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg.

The study, which followed 17 African-American patients with type 2 diabetes from the Charlotte-based CMC Biddle Point practice between 2016 and 2017, showed significant evidence that peer-supported self-management groups helped those patients achieve better health outcomes. It was conducted by Florence Okoro, Ph.D, RN, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte School of Nursing, with help from CCPGM’s Provider Services & Population Outreach Program Manager Valencia Davis, MHA, and Community Health Worker Frankie King. Okoro recently published her findings in a research article titled “Culturally Appropriate Peer-Led Behavior Support Program for African Americans with Type 2 Diabetes.” (https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00340/full)

After extensive research and conversations with the patients in the Charlotte area, the study revealed that peer support has led to better diabetes self-management outcomes. It also showed that peer support programs tailored to the needs of diabetes patients may be a viable way to reach traditionally underrepresented populations, such as low-income African Americans.

Biddle Point medical director Emily Cooper, MD, was impressed with the results of the study.

“I refer patients to the diabetes class all the time. It’s so much more powerful to have the patients talk to someone who has the same health issues. It’s just phenomenal the attention this class has received,” Cooper said.

She said medical professionals are always looking for ways to get people involved in their own self-care.

“I want this to serve as an example in our healthcare system of the importance of peer support. This shows it’s an important piece of the puzzle. We serve a large financially underserved population who have no insurance and we have to make miracles happen. This class is a way to do that,” she said.

Janet Ann McAndrews, CCPGM Health Educator

CCPGM Health Educator Janet Ann McAndrews, MPH, CHES, helps coordinate the diabetes peer-supported patient education self-management group, which offers a variety of healthy lifestyle information for patients such as appropriate foods and exercises. The importance of the group is evident in the reaction from patients, she said.

“We have a 40-year-old male patient who attended a few of these self-management groups. He later told us ‘I have learned more in two sessions at Biddle Point as a new patient than during four years as a diabetes patient at another practice,’” McAndrews said. “This type of reaction indicates that patients are learning important healthy lifestyle behaviors for dealing with diabetes and related conditions.”

King said the research study involved many one-on-one conversations with patients. She and Okoro’s research assistant would often meet with patients during and after the group meetings, and later at restaurants or patient homes, to provide additional support.

“We would often visit 2 to 3 patients at their homes each week, sometimes in the evenings or on weekends. It took a whole year to work on the study,” King said.

She hopes the study will encourage doctors to prioritize peer-supported self-management groups.

“I’m excited to show doctors that peer support really works and if they implement it in hospitals and practices, it would help improve the health of patients,” King said. “It was a lot of work, but I enjoyed working with the patients. I’ve come a long way to get my own health under control, so I love to help patients do the same thing.”

Besides the Diabetes class, McAndrews helps coordinate two other self-management classes for CCPGM focusing on Healthy Lifestyles and Chronic Pain.

“We just ventured out this past fall to sites we’ve never been to outside the standard medical practice model. We’ve gone to retirement centers and community housing centers, among other locations. We’ve found that transportation is the biggest barrier, so if we can get to where patients are living, then there is increased attendance and, if needed, we can connect them with a medical home. It’s a win-win for patients and providers,” McAndrews said. “In 2019, as part of our continual growth and commitment to helping population health and community outreach, CCPGM is starting a chronic pain self-management group to help providers and patients with alternative pain management methods as they navigate new opiate regulations.”

About CCPGM

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg is a community-based healthcare network participating in the statewide Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) physician-led program. Since 2002, CCPGM has provided care coordination and care management for Medicaid recipients and others in Anson, Mecklenburg and Union counties. CCPGM works with primary care providers, hospitals, health departments, behavioral health management entities, Departments of Social Services, housing agencies, crisis providers, and other local community agencies and resources to provide the best coordinated care for its patients. The network has about 190,000 enrollees and 189 medical homes practicing family medicine, obstetrics, internal medicine and pediatrics. To learn more, visit CCPGM online at www.ccpgm.org, or on Facebook, Twitter (CCPGM) and Instagram (CCPGM_NC).

From Science to Practice: Implementing Trauma-Informed Care

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 15, 2018

Media Contact: Chris Sardelli, christopher.sardelli@atriumhealth.org

Josh Diliberto, CCPGM’s Behavioral Health Integration Coordinator

As awareness of and toxic stress grows among Charlotte-area providers, local experts are hoping new educational opportunities will help unite providers, patients and the community.

Helping to lay the groundwork in explaining how adverse childhood events can translate to medical issues among adults are several experts associated with Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg. They include CCPGM’s Network Psychiatrist Karen Melendez, MD, as well as Josh Diliberto, CCPGM’s Behavioral Health Integration Coordinator and licensed counselor, and Claire Santos, a Charlotte-area trauma educator who provides expertise to CCPGM. The three will be on hand Nov. 16 to offer knowledge during the Mecklenburg Resilience Symposium: Building Hope for Tomorrow Through Action Today. The event is being held at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Charlotte.

Diliberto said it’s important for providers to learn how to recognize and treat toxic stress when it presents in a patient.

“Trauma-informed care is about patient empowerment and providing a social-emotionally aware environment that evokes safety, trust and dependability. It is a way of approaching patients to evoke assets and strengths and engagement through a lens of well-being over pathology,” he said. “There is a movement in healthcare to integrate services and develop patient-centered medical homes where symptoms can be examined and explained holistically, biologically, sociologically, psychologically and spiritually. The key ingredients for successful trauma-informed care implementation, according to the Center for Health Care Strategies, are involving patients in the treatment process, screening for trauma, training staff in trauma-specific treatment, and engaging referral sources and partnering organizations.”

The symposium is a good first step in exploring how to begin the conversation at the clinical level and then expanding into the community, he said.

“We’re looking at how to best address the emergent science on trauma clinically and how to contribute to community-wide efforts through collaboration and the pooling of knowledge and resources,” he said.

For Santos, trauma-informed care is about considering how trauma affects people differently and how to design interventions and processes related to trauma.

“Two-thirds of the population has experienced some sort of trauma. Trauma is very far-reaching and affects every aspect of health and wellness,” Santos said. “Everybody is affected by trauma and it’s important for healthcare providers to be in tune with it. If there is trauma present, then symptoms may look like something else and doctors end up treating it with medicine, but it may end up the person doesn’t have that condition.”

The trauma-informed care symposium will begin with a screening of the film “Resilience,” followed by various panel discussions focusing on how adverse child events and toxic stress can affect a person’s health. Topics include creating trauma-informed communities, learning how to be mindful, viewing resiliency with a legislative perspective, and brainstorming solutions to toxic stress. To find out more about the event, please visit www.charlotteahec.org/continuing-professional-development/event.cfm?eventid=56743. To learn more about trauma-informed care, please contact Diliberto at joshua.diliberto@atriumhealth.org.

About CCPGM

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg is a community-based healthcare network participating in the statewide Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) physician-led program. Since 2002, CCPGM has provided care coordination and care management for Medicaid recipients and others in Anson, Mecklenburg and Union counties. CCPGM works with primary care providers, hospitals, health departments, behavioral health management entities, Departments of Social Services, housing agencies, crisis providers, and other local community agencies and resources to provide the best coordinated care for its patients. The network has about 190,000 enrollees and 189 medical homes practicing family medicine, obstetrics, internal medicine and pediatrics. To learn more, visit CCPGM online at www.ccpgm.org, or on Facebook, Twitter (CCPGM) and Instagram (CCPGM_NC).

Collaborative Care Codes Now Active

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 25, 2018

Media Contact: Chris Sardelli, christopher.sardelli@atriumhealth.org

Providers who have assisted patients with psychiatric collaborative care management in primary care settings can now be reimbursed for the services, per a recent statement from N.C. Medicaid.

Karen Melendez, MD, CCPGM Network Psychiatrist

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg (CCPGM) Network Psychiatrist Karen Melendez, MD, said in recent years the Collaborative Care model has been at the forefront of multiple discussions at the national, state and regional level.

The collaborative care model works by involving a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals to deliver coordinated care to a patient. In this case, behavioral health care managers work alongside primary care providers and psychiatrists to customize care for behavioral health patients who are being followed through a patient registry.

“The CCNC (Community Care of North Carolina) central office Behavioral Health team has been meeting with DMA monthly and advocating for the collaborative care codes to be reimbursed by N.C. Medicaid,” Melendez said. “The Collaborative Care Codes became active on N.C. Medicaid on Oct. 1. This means that North Carolina is the third state in the country, only behind New York and Washington, where the model was developed, to approve reimbursement of the codes by Medicaid.”

The reimbursement rates are as follows:

  • 99492: $73.86, $130.64 (facility rate, non-facility rate)
  • 99493: $66.78, $104.54 (facility rate, non-facility rate)
  • 9949
    4: $35.63, $54.08 (facility rate, non-facility rate)

The full description of the approved codes can be found starting on page 18 of the N.C. Medicaid September Provider Bulletin at: https://files.nc.gov/ncdma/documents/files/Medicaid-Bulletin-2018-09_0.pdf.

“The American Psychiatric Association, along with the University of Washington AIMS Center, has been working diligently on training psychiatrists in this new consulting role,” Melendez said.

The goal, she said, is to train 3,500 psychiatrists over four years.

“The collaborative care model will impact the 50 percent of patients that do not follow through when referred to psychiatric services and improve the care of the 70 percent of patients who obtain mental health care in primary care clinics,” she said.

Primary care providers who want to learn more about the model can earn free CME through the American Psychiatric Association at:

https://education.psychiatry.org/Users/ProductDetails.aspx?Activityid=4743&ProductID=4743&_ga=2.200146861.229620433.1536002332-1018866782.1527004955

About CCPGM

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg is a community-based healthcare network participating in the statewide Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) physician-led program. Since 2002, CCPGM has provided care coordination and care management for Medicaid recipients and others in Anson, Mecklenburg and Union counties. CCPGM works with primary care providers, hospitals, health departments, behavioral health management entities, Departments of Social Services, housing agencies, crisis providers, and other local community agencies and resources to provide the best coordinated care for its patients. The network has about 190,000 enrollees and 189 medical homes practicing family medicine, obstetrics, internal medicine and pediatrics.

To learn more, visit CCPGM online at www.ccpgm.org, or on Facebook, Twitter (CCPGM) and Instagram (CCPGM_NC).

CCPGM Hosts First Annual Mecklenburg County Palliative Care Fair

CCPGM Hosts First Annual Mecklenburg County Palliative Care Fair

Event links palliative care services to surrounding community

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 12, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Sardelli, christopher.sardelli@carolinashealthcare.org

CHARLOTTE- Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg (CCPGM) is gearing up for its first annual Mecklenburg County Palliative Care Fair, part of an ongoing effort to showcase palliative care services and resources to the local community.

The event will be held Thursday, Oct. 26, from 10 a.m. to noon. at CCPGM’s Headquarters, 4701 Hedgemore Drive, Suite 700.

Several Palliative Care and Hospice Agencies from Charlotte and surrounding communities are expected to participate. The event will spotlight resources available for providing supportive, medical care to those with a serious illness.

CCPGM Chronic Pain and Palliative Care Program Coordinator Shawn Berigan said the free event is open to anyone in the community, including consumers, care managers, providers and other healthcare or community organizations.

“I think it’s important to let the community know about resources they could be utilizing if they need Palliative Care services now,” Berigan said. “I also want to encourage others to have conversations about their end of life care in case something unexpected were to happen. We plan for everything in life from weddings and birthdays to graduations. Why wouldn’t we plan for end of life care?”

The main goal of the fair is to help people learn how they, their families or their patients can live their best lives while managing a long-term disease.

“You can have conversations with knowledgeable representatives to learn more about adult and pediatric palliative care, hospice, support groups and more,” she said.

About CCPGM

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg is a community-based healthcare network participating in the statewide Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) physician-led program. Since 2002, CCPGM has provided care coordination and care management for Medicaid recipients and others in Anson, Mecklenburg and Union counties. CCPGM works with primary care providers, hospitals, health departments, behavioral health management entities, Departments of Social Services, housing agencies, crisis providers, and other local community agencies and resources to provide the best coordinated care for its patients. The network has about 190,000 enrollees and more than 200 medical homes practicing family medicine, obstetrics, internal medicine and pediatrics.

To learn more, visit CCPGM online at www.ccpgm.org, or on Facebook, Twitter (CCPGM) and Instagram (CCPGM_NC).

Contact

For more information about the event or to RSVP, please contact CCPGM’s Chronic Pain and Palliative Care Coordinator Shawn Berigan by calling (704) 512-5555 or by email at Shawn.Berigan@carolinashealthcare.org. To request media interviews, please contact Chris Sardelli, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (704) 512-2658 or by email at christopher.sardelli@carolinashealthcare.org.

CCPGM Pharmacy Fair Draws Crowd

Local pharmacies came together May 11 at Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg’s Fifth Annual Mecklenburg County Pharmacy Fair.

Held at CCPGM’s Charlotte headquarters, the event boasted attendance from 15 independent and CPESN pharmacies from across Mecklenburg and Union counties.

Nicole Banahene, a Clinic Relations Manager with N.C. MedAssist, said the event is always a great way for pharmacies to meet with medical professionals who are working with patients.

“We serve the uninsured across the state of North Carolina and this event gives us a chance to work with people who have one-on-one contact with patients. It helps us give the chance to show the services we offer and lets people hear about what we do,” Banahene said.

N.C. MedAssist is a non-profit pharmacy program that provides prescription medication, patient support, advocacy and other services to vulnerable or uninsured North Carolina residents.

“A lot of people offer low-cost medication, but if a person is on many medications it can still be a lot. They come to us if they need help with medication. Plus, we can help in those situations where if someone just needs ibuprofen, they don’t have to go to the ER to get it,” she said.

Chad Sandy, a provider advocate with Physicians Pharmacy Alliance, also attended the event. He spoke to CCPGM care managers about how his pharmacy services company helps patients with chronic conditions and complex therapy regimens.

“We’re a Medication Care Management program that helps reduce hospital readmission by 25 percent,” Sandy said. “We had a patient we worked with who had 200 medications. Now he is on eight and we helped put him on payment plans. We do a lot of good things, like helping patients with their adherence.”

He looks forward to CCPGM’s pharmacy fair each year.

“I love this event. It’s great to see other pharmacies and get everyone in the same room at the same time,” he said. “Everybody is very happy and appreciative of coming here and learning what we do and how we help patients. I just wish there was more of these.”

Natalie Anderson, a clinical pharmacist with Dilworth Drug, enjoys making connections within the local medical community.

“Our hope is we can help them help their patients. We want to work together to manage diseases. A big one for us is diabetes. Ideally we want to catch that before they get to the medication or insulin stage,” Anderson said. “We want to give patients the information they need because people don’t know enough. The goal is to take each patient and work with them on an individual basis.”

CCPGM Pharmacy and Orientation Program Coordinator Christina Wall was pleased with this year’s turnout and the variety among pharmacy attendees.

“This is always a good showcase for our pharmacies and their resources,” Wall said.

CCPGM also hosted the Second Annual Union County Pharmacy Fair days later on May 16 at the CMC Union Auditorium.

 

Christopher Sardelli, CCPGM Communications & Marketing Associate, (704) 512-2658

CCPGM Hosts Fifth Annual Pharmacy Fair

CCPGM Hosts Fifth Annual Pharmacy Fair

Event links pharmacies to surrounding community

FOR RELEASE May 10, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Sardelli, christopher.sardelli@carolinashealthcare.org

CHARLOTTE- Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg (CCPGM) is gearing up for its fifth annual Mecklenburg County Pharmacy Fair, part of an ongoing effort to showcase local pharmacies to the surrounding medical community.

The event will be held Thursday, May 11, from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at CCPGM headquarters, 4701 Hedgemore Drive, Suite 700.

Fifteen pharmacies are expected to participate in the event, a group that covers the entire county and CCPGM’s almost 190,000 enrollees. Also attending are representatives from NC MedAssist, a non-profit pharmacy program providing prescription medicine and patient support to uninsured North Carolina residents.

CCPGM Deputy Director Naomi Ohuabunwa-West said the annual event was launched five years ago in an effort to inform CCPGM’s care managers and teammates about pharmacy partners and resources in the community. Sponsored by the CCPGM pharmacy team, the event is a great opportunity to learn about the special services and resources these businesses have to offer.

Last year, the event showcased 12 local pharmacies and attracted more than 70 attendees, though more are expected this year.

“Over the years it has grown to become an avenue for linking these pharmacies with other disciplines, stakeholders and community organizations,” Ohuabunwa-West said.

She said there will also be representation from pharmacies of the Community Pharmacy Enhanced Services Network (CPESN).

“This year, we are also excited to include amongst our list of participants, NC MedAssist, which provides medications to uninsured patients,” she said.

This event is open to care managers and other healthcare and community organizations that serve the Mecklenburg County region.

CCPGM will also be hosting its second annual Union County Pharmacy Fair on Tuesday, May 16 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at CMC Union Auditorium, 600 Hospital Drive, Monroe, NC 28112. The fair is open to partners from Union and Anson counties.

 

About CCPGM

Community Care Partners of Greater Mecklenburg is a community-based healthcare network participating in the statewide Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) physician-led program. Since 2002, CCPGM has provided care coordination and care management for Medicaid recipients and others in Anson, Mecklenburg and Union counties. CCPGM works with primary care providers, hospitals, health departments, behavioral health management entities, Departments of Social Services, housing agencies, crisis providers, and other local community agencies and resources to provide the best coordinated care for its patients. The network has about 190,000 enrollees and more than 200 medical homes practicing family medicine, obstetrics, internal medicine and pediatrics.

To learn more, visit CCPGM online at www.ccpgm.org, or on Facebook, Twitter (CCPGM) and Instagram (CCPGM_NC).

 

Contact

For more information about the event or to RSVP, please contact CCPGM’s Pharmacy and Orientation Program Coordinator Christina Wall by email at Christina.wall@carolinashealthcare.org. To request interviews, please contact Chris Sardelli, Communications and Marketing Associate, at (704) 512-2658 or by email at christopher.sardelli@carolinashealthcare.org.

 

The 2017 North Carolina Child Health Report Card: Children’s Health Insurance Coverage

NC Child & The North Carolina Institute of Medicine (NCIOM) are releasing the 2017 North Carolina Child Health Report Card, which tracks key indicators on healthy births, access to care, safe homes and neighborhoods, and health risk factors over time and by race and ethnicity. This year’s report takes an in-depth look at North Carolina children’s access to health insurance.

CLICK HERE to access the 2017 North Carolina Child Health Toolkit. 

 

 

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